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Vintage Bud Vase Glass Bottle

Rectangular-shaped vase and single bud vase in antique clear glass

why we love this
product information
story
about the maker
An aged glass bottle brings a sense of old-world grace to any room. With the silhouette of an apothecary bottle, it’s equally lovely when used as a vase or simply as a decoration piece. The vintage glass, with its natural bubbling, filters the light, adding a soft, romantic look to a windowsill or desktop.
  • Length: 8 inches
  • Diameter: 2.25 inches
The earliest known man-made glass dates back to around 3500 BC, when the Egyptians learned how to heat sand to create a glaze, and eventually made vessels by applying the glaze to the outside of rounded clay forms, dipping the forms in molten material, and, when cool, carving out the clay form. For a long time, glassware was the mark of the rich and noble; it wasn’t until about the third century that glass manufacturing became refined enough that lower classes could afford them. Today, vintage glass, with all its imperfections, has become a collectible, prized for its authenticity. Air bubbles, which become trapped in the glass during manufacturing, add to the appeal and value. These HomArt vintage glass bottles connect the past to the present.
why we love this
An aged glass bottle brings a sense of old-world grace to any room. With the silhouette of an apothecary bottle, it’s equally lovely when used as a vase or simply as a decoration piece. The vintage glass, with its natural bubbling, filters the light, adding a soft, romantic look to a windowsill or desktop.
product information
  • Length: 8 inches
  • Diameter: 2.25 inches
story
The earliest known man-made glass dates back to around 3500 BC, when the Egyptians learned how to heat sand to create a glaze, and eventually made vessels by applying the glaze to the outside of rounded clay forms, dipping the forms in molten material, and, when cool, carving out the clay form. For a long time, glassware was the mark of the rich and noble; it wasn’t until about the third century that glass manufacturing became refined enough that lower classes could afford them. Today, vintage glass, with all its imperfections, has become a collectible, prized for its authenticity. Air bubbles, which become trapped in the glass during manufacturing, add to the appeal and value. These HomArt vintage glass bottles connect the past to the present.

Serenity, simplicity, and warmth—these qualities resonate throughout HomArt’s collection of objects and furnishings. Sustainability is also at the heart of the California company’s approach to decor. Some of its one-of-a-kind products are discovered on antiquing trips around the world, at Indian souks, Asian bazaars and European flea markets. Others are crafted from recycled materials by artists who transform abandoned materials into new decorative objects with a timeless charm.

about the maker

Serenity, simplicity, and warmth—these qualities resonate throughout HomArt’s collection of objects and furnishings. Sustainability is also at the heart of the California company’s approach to decor. Some of its one-of-a-kind products are discovered on antiquing trips around the world, at Indian souks, Asian bazaars and European flea markets. Others are crafted from recycled materials by artists who transform abandoned materials into new decorative objects with a timeless charm.